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B. Richard Collebrusco

B. Richard Collebrusco was born in 1993, April 5th, in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

 

Suffering from the onset of Childhood Apraxia, a disability where the brain cannot effectively communicate with the muscles that allow for speech, Collebrusco was always a sort of outcast amongst his peers. A victim of extreme bullying throughout his early years, the boy that would come to write ‘The Blood of Hell’s Vengeance Series’ had found himself secluded from a normal life. While other children during recess would go and have fun on the playground, Collebrusco would always be sitting on a bench or a picnic table with a notebook in hand, drawing or writing – creating fantasy worlds or imagining battles being waged around him between knights, horsemen, and steady men-at-arms.

 

As Collebrusco grew through the years, he started to suffer depressive states from his social isolation. While he did have friends, he always felt they merely tolerated his presence more than welcoming him with open arms. And in these years, he suffered. Becoming ever the more separated from those around him, often losing himself in his own imagination, where he felt safest. All throughout Middle School and High School, and even a little while afterward, there were too few who could say they understood or really knew the boy who merely seemed to exist.

 

It was then he began to dive into the histories of the real world, the languages and cultures that filled it as he found a sort of fascination within such remarkable stories of old, particularly in the mythologies of the Celtic and Norse cultures. This was when he started the preliminary concepts of the world that would become his first book.

 

And then, Collebrusco started to thrive.

 

After leaving High School and spending a few years searching for his own path, trying to find an identity of his own, B. Richard Collebrusco adapted to his newfound surroundings, undertaking new challenges that he never thought himself capable of doing. He expanded his intellectual and academic capabilities, became more social, and found a manner of speaking that could distract others from recognizing the Apraxia that had been the source of so much pain throughout his life.

 

But such achievements have come at a price.

 

No longer did the boy that once sat on the bench during recess exist. For the purpose of reshaping his identity, and mold himself into the kind of person he wanted to become, Collebrusco distanced himself from his past. To him, the boy that was born without a voice had died.

 

He has come to stand apart.

 

 

A Note From B. Richard Collebrusco

When I started this project in late 2009, it was my third year in High School, during the start of a class on creative writing. The next year and a half would be spent filling out the margins of my notebooks, trying to create something that only a few had achieved. 

 

That was when I began delving into the history and mythologies of the world – both the real one, and the one I was building. Undertaking the subtle natures of the languages and cultures throughout history to form the basis of the peoples I deemed to formulate, and building the foundations of the Aarendelic and Iírdun dialects seen throughout this book.

 

By the time I finished the first chapters of the earliest draft, I came into a realization concerning the time period the story was set, so I started to make drastic changes as I rewrote the lore from scratch. THE TALE OF GALRON AND CYRIDEL thus came into fruition.

 

This meant that many of the characters would shift attributes between themselves, as personalities changed, as would their names.

 

Galron of the Hiírom was perhaps the one who saw the most drastic shift. He was originally intended as the personification of the Doomed King before Icurian during the conceptualization of the Vedrel of Old to explain the origin of the Vedrethal. As such, Galron took on a more heroic tone of voice as Icurian slowly turned into a greater rival.

 

These changes proved necessary in order to tell the story written these pages beyond. A legend would never reach its peak without embellishment garnered with every retelling. That was how I looked to writing this beginning tale, as I hoped to build a world whose history could rival that of the one we live in daily.

 

More is written than what’s told in this book, and I plan to continue building it with the support offered by those who understand the passion that drives me.

 

But I am a lone storyteller trying to describe a tale spanning centuries, where the characters may not all be as they first seem. Aaurians (Míran) are described as elven, but they are not themselves elves; Hadorns described as dwarven, but are not dwarves; and the Hiírom are described as men, but they are not of mankind, as the Aenüriale (Neümorians and Vedrethal) are not part of mere humanity.

 

These characters are entities all their own while they play their parts among the weaves of an unfolding tapestry. And the Vedreron… well, they are part of a different tale entirely.

 

Sincerely,

 

B. Richard Collebrusco 

 
Current Releases
Here stands the first volume of the beginning tales behind the history of Arroon as it stands during a time of great strife, known collectively as, THE BLOOD OF HELL’S VENGEANCE.   Here will be told, THE TALE OF GALRON AND CYRIDEL, w...
Available Now!
Tale of Galron and Cyridel

B. Richard Collebrusco's Links:

https://www.amazon.com/B.-Richard-Collebrusco/e/B01MT3W707/





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